Instead of laying people off, employers can consider offering reduced work weeks or job share situations. This gives employees the security of on-going employment, while also allowing for more time with family members. The reduction in pay can often be countered by a reduction in child care costs.
It can be a win, win situation for everyone!

Another option is to look at a flexible schedule. For many working parents, flexibility is a huge draw to a certain company or job opportunity. The ability to take a day to chaperone a class field trip or volunteer at a child’s school can be priceless.

Finally, employers can save money and keep high-performing employees happy by allowing for telecommuting. In this age of technology, why not let people work from home, as long as they are getting the work done well? I know for myself, a few quiet hours in my home office can be extremely productive – there are fewer interruptions and I can truly keep my focus on the project at hand.

Balancing work and family life is not easy, and things change from week to week, and month to month. However, know that as you may be struggling with balance, you are not alone. In fact, I’d say you are in good company!

Here are few articles with great tips for working moms (and parents):

http://balancing-career-mothering.suite101.com/article.cfm/strategies_for_work_life_balance

http://www.businessweek.com/careers/workingparents/blog/archives/2007/03/worklife_balanc.html

http://www.google.ca/search?sourceid=navclient&ie=UTF-8&rlz=1T4TSHC_enCA303CA303&q=Work%2flife+balance+moms

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/opinions/article757602.ece